Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Interview Part 4: Pedro Lopez, Worked Out

Binghamton manager Pedro Lopez, second from right, talking with players in the dugout before an August 2014 game. (G21D Photo)
Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

Pedro Lopez got the chance in 1992 to show what he could do at AA Wichita. He also got the chance to play under a future major league manager in Bruce Bochy.

It was that time playing under Bochy that Lopez credits with influencing him in his own career as a manager in the minors. 

"I think Boch, he really just made an impact on my life, on my career, because he was that guy that always said 'just go out there and play the game,'" Lopez told The Greatest 21 Days recently. "And you know what? I did that. I did that from my second year on and it worked out."

It worked out, he said, because that approach means his players aren't afraid of making errors. It also works because Lopez was a player himself.

Lopez played as a professional for 13 years. He made AAA, but not the majors. He's now spent 14 years trying to get younger players to the bigs, as a minor league manager.

Then, after a quarter century in the minor leagues, in September 2013, he finally made the majors. He was there for just three weeks, serving as a coach. But he was there.
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez in his NYSEG Stadium office in August 2014. (G21D Photo)
Lopez spoke to The Greatest 21 Days recently in his NYSEG Stadium office in Binghamton. Lopez covered his time growing up and learning the game in Puerto Rico, to his long professional playing career. He also told of his now long career as a manager in the minors.

Lopez started his post-playing career in 2001, with the Rangers. The Rangers offered him a managerial job, but Lopez wanted to start as a hitting coach to gain some experience.

Assigned to single-A Savannah, Lopez recalled it was his job to coach third base. An early situation give him the opportunity to show his knowledge of the game, he recalled.

Lopez took the third base coaching box and figured it was his job to look to his manager for signs to give the batter.

In a crucial spot in his second game, though, he looked to his manager and there was no response. It was a tie game in the eighth inning, runner on first, and Edwin Encarnacion, the second batter in the lineup, was up.

"I look in the dugout for a sign from the manager and he's looking at the lineup card, not even looking at me," Lopez recalled of that second game. "I'm like 'oh, my God, really?'"

Lopez then called it himself, a hit-and-run. It worked.

Afterward, Lopez' manager called him into the office. Why did he call for a hit-and-run instead of a sacrifice bunt?
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez coaching third base at NYSEG Stadium in August 2014. (G21D Photo)
Lopez explained why: Encarnacion was known to hit the ball the other way and he was a good situational hitter. The pitcher threw a lot of fastballs, meaning the chances were low for off-speed pitches.

"I say 'why not?'" Lopez recalled saying after his explanation. "'Why not be aggressive with our best guys coming up?"

The manager hadn't thought about it that way. He also told Lopez to keep it up.


That first week Lopez also picked up a bad habit They weren't in spring training anymore and the games counted. Lopez felt like his knees were shaking out in the third base coaching box.

"I didn't want people to know my knees were shaking, so I started putting my hands on my knees so they would stop shaking," Lopez said.

He recalled finally getting away from that except in certain situations because it didn't look right.


Lopez moved up to manager himself later that season, when the opening came. He moved to rookie Pulaski in 2002. He spent four seasons in the Arizona League. By 2011, he was in the Florida State League managing the St. Lucie Mets.

He arrived at Binghamton in 2012, where he continues managing for 2014.
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez, No. 16, in the dugout in August 2014 in Binghamton. (G21D Photo)
In that time, Lopez has followed Bochy's example and he lets his players play.

"It's just like raising your kids," Lopez said. "They drop a glass, it breaks and the first thing they do is look at you as the parent to see what the parent's reaction is going to be. Make no mistake about it, it's no different with players."

Along the way, Lopez returned to his native Puerto Rico and got to manage in winter ball there. He even won a championship.

Then, in September 2013, he made his way to the place he had been trying to send his players and the place he spent 13 years trying to get to as a player: the majors.

The call came out of the blue, like it often is with players.

Binghamton's season over, Lopez returned home to Puerto Rico Sept. 9. Pulling into his garage the next day after a trip to pick up his daughters from school, his phone rang.

On the other end was New York Mets manager Terry Collins. Collins wanted Lopez in Queens to help coach for the final three weeks.
Citi Field in Queens in 2009. Pedro Lopez got called up to coach at Citi Field in September 2013. (G21D Photo)
"I think I was speechless for a few minutes," Lopez said. "I had tears coming out of my eyes. I still do. Because, once again, it's a dream that I never reached as a player and being able to do it last year as a coach, it was really neat."

He arrived the next day.

"I really have to tell you, you talk about all those dreams and all those goals as a player and then you see yourself in that major league clubhouse and just going out there for the anthem and just watching that ballpark, it feels like you're probably an inch tall," Lopez said.

Then there was the last day. "Coming out of that clubhouse the last day knowing there was not going to be no more big leagues, at least for now, it was sad," Lopez said. "It was really sad."

At least for now.

As for how long Lopez will continue, the 45-year-old said that's as long as he doesn't forget how he started.

"I know what it feels like to be a player," Lopez said. "I still remember what it feels like to be a player and I'm always saying that the day I forget what it feels like to be a player, that's the day that I got to walk away from the game because then I have nothing to offer."

Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

Read Part 1: Pedro Lopez, Different Perspective

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Interview Part 3: Pedro Lopez, Drives Him

Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez motions in the dugout at NYSEG Stadium in August 2014. (G21D Photo)
Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

Pedro Lopez played 13 seasons as a pro. He made AAA in five of those seasons. He never played in the majors.

What kept him in the game so long?

"I think the love for the game, I have to tell you," Lopez told The Greatest 21 Days recently. "And that's what I teach these guys every day and that's still the thing that drives me now that I'm doing this.

"I love the game. I love being around the game. I enjoy helping people."

Lopez is still in the game, spending his 14th season as a manager in the minors. For 2014, he's serving as manager of the AA Binghamton Mets.

In 2013, after a quarter century in the game as a player and manager, Lopez finally made the majors, spending that September as a coach with the Mets in Queens.

As a player, though, there were close calls, Lopez recalled, mainly toward the end. 
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez coaches third in August 2013.
Lopez spoke to The Greatest 21 Days recently in his NYSEG Stadium office in Binghamton. Lopez covered his time growing up and learning the game in Puerto Rico, to his long professional playing career. He also told of his now long career as a manager in the minors.

Lopez played his 13 seasons in the Padres, Brewers and Astros systems. He spent his final four seasons with the Astros.

He played spring training 2000 in big league camp with the Astros. He'd been in big league camp before, with both the Padres and Brewers. He was also there with the Astros in 1999.

In spring 2000, though, Lopez stayed with the big club until late. He had the chance to catch Shane Reynolds, he recalled. Sent down late in camp, Lopez soon found his elbow injured.

"I don't know how it happened," Lopez said. Just out of the blue, it started. I felt a pinch in my elbow. My elbow never hurt."

He tried to play through it. It didn't work. A few days later, he went down to the bullpen in a game at Lakeland, and his elbow went out.

"I caught the ball behind the plate and I went to throw it back and the ball probably went five feet from me," Lopez recalled. "It just went straight down."
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez, center, meets with umpires before an August 2014 game. (G21D Photo)
He went to AAA New Orleans and tried to rehab it. He got into just eight games. Soon, he was released. It was the only time in his career that he was released.

Though Lopez recalled it seemed apparent the end was coming, it was still tough when it finally came. He recalled telling his wife Gladys what had happened.

"I told her with tears in my eyes," Lopez recalled. "I was like, 'you know what? As much as I love doing what I do, I think this is a sign. This is a sign from the Lord that 'There's better things for you. I think you have to move forward' and I did."

Lopez went back home and had surgery on his elbow. The surgery required five months without throwing, six months without hitting. He was done.

Soon after, though, Lopez recalled getting word through a friend that a major league injury shortly after Lopez was released may have resulted in Lopez finally being called up, had he been healthy.

Lopez said he's rarely talked about that. That's because, he said, it's never crossed his mind.

"I don't look back saying I'm sorry or feeling regrets about it or anything like that," Lopez said, "because, once again, I'm supposed to be where I'm supposed to be. This is my purpose in life."
Pedro Lopez, manager of the St. Lucie Mets, coaches third at Digital Domain Park in 2011. (G21D Photo)
A couple years earlier, Lopez recalled getting a call from the Rangers. The call came with an offer of a job as a coach.

Lopez was already headed to big league camp with the Astros, so he passed. He was still a player.

If something happened, Lopez promised he'd give them a call. After his surgery, Lopez called. That November, he was hired by the Rangers as a minor league coach.

His stint as a coach ended up being brief. Soon, the former catcher in 13 minor league seasons was in his first year as a minor league manager.

The club actually wanted Lopez to start as a manager, he recalled. But Lopez wasn't so sure that's where he wanted to start.

He recalled telling the team that. He'd just got done playing, he wanted a chance to observe as a coach first.

"If you think that I'm a candidate to manage then I'll do it," Lopez recalled responding, "because I like challenges. I just don't want to throw myself into that situation without getting my feet wet."

Lopez soon got his chance to observe. He also got his chance to show what he knew.

Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

Go to Part 4: Pedro Lopez, Worked Out

Monday, August 25, 2014

Interview Part 2: Pedro Lopez, That Ride

Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez, left, oversees fielding practice in August 2014 at NYSEG Stadium in Binghamton. (G21D Photo)
Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

When Pedro Lopez couldn't get a ride back to the team apartments with a teammate, he called a cab.

It was 1990 and Lopez was playing for the single-A Charleston Rainbows, at least he was on the team. He wasn't getting much playing time.

On this night, the ride back was to be by taxi. Lopez recalled kind of preferring it that way.

"I was just by myself all the time," Lopez recalled recently to The Greatest 21 Days. "I was a loner."

His batting average was far from where it needed to be. Lopez was also far from home. But a member of the Charleston booster club was far from home, too. They shared the same home, Puerto Rico.

"One day I remember I was the last one out of the clubhouse," Lopez recalled. "He happened to drive by the ballpark and saw me waiting for a taxi."

The booster offered Lopez a ride.
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez throws some batting practice in August 2014. (G21D Photo)
It was a ride that Lopez recalled changed his outlook. It also helped him stay in the game another decade as a player. And he's still in the game in 2014 as manager for the AA Binghamton Mets.

Lopez spoke to The Greatest 21 Days recently in his NYSEG Stadium office in Binghamton, telling the story of that night at Charleston and others spanning his more-than quarter century in the game.

Lopez covered his time growing up and learning the game in Puerto Rico, to his long professional playing career. He also told of his now long career as a manager in the minors.

But, helping make that long career happen, was that ride in Charleston, S.C. The booster, Lopez recalled, drove him to the team apartments and they talked. They continued talking once they arrived, moving on the hood of the car.

The conversation went from Lopez being loner to religion, to church.

Out of that conversation, Lopez recalled praying.

"I told the Lord, I pray to the Lord, 'If I don't make the big leagues, so be it. I just want to go back to being the same Pedro Lopez I was before, because I know for a fact that I'm not," Lopez said. "And I tell you what, He heard me. He really did.

"I had really good years. I had chances and it never happened," Lopez said of making the big leagues. "But you know what, I went back to being the same person again."
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez conducts fielding practice before an August 2014 game at Binghamton. (G21D Photo)
Out of that, Lopez also started going to church again. It was something he recalled telling his mother about. "It really changed my life."

After starting the year largely on the bench, Lopez soon found himself in the lineup again. He recalled doing well until he broke his finger on a sacrifice bunt.

The ball threatened to hit him in the face. As he got out of the way, it hit his finger. He ended up hitting just .198 in 32 games that year. His next season was delayed by another injury. Assigned back to single-A Waterloo, though, Lopez took off.

In 102 games, the catcher hit .284. He also hit a career high eight home runs and knocked in 57.

"I had a terrific year," Lopez recalled of that season at Waterloo, his second overall in the city. "Then all of a sudden I'm back on the map again."

He found himself at AA Wichita in 1992, then got his first look at AAA in 1994 at Las Vegas. Once he got to Wichita, Lopez remembered thinking he had a chance at the majors.

Along the way, Lopez got married. He got married in 1993 to his longtime girlfriend Gladys. They celebrated their 20th wedding anniversary in 2013, the same year Lopez celebrated his first time in the majors, three weeks spent there in September as a coach.

They soon started a family. He went to spring training 1995 knowing he was going to be a father. The second day of spring training, the minor leaguer found out he was going to be a father twice over: He and his wife were having twins.
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez returns to the dugout after exchanging lineup cards in an August 2014 game at Binghamton. (G21D Photo)
Lopez loved the game, so he stayed in it. He also loved his family and he needed to provide for them.

"This is the only thing I know how to do," Lopez recalled thinking. "I'm a little too old now to go back to school and make a career at something I always wanted to do and I just kept on going."

Lopez eventually played in 13 professional seasons. In five of those seasons, he saw time at AAA. He never played in the majors. He played seven seasons in the Padres system, two in the Brewers system and four seasons in the minors with the Astros.

For Lopez, he said he is fine with that. If he didn't make the majors, he wasn't meant to make the majors.

"I feel like, even though it's everybody's dream, everybody that's involved in baseball, to be at the major league level, I always say the Lord's got better plans for us and He's got a better purpose.

"My purpose was not necessarily to be in the big leagues and making a lot of money. My purpose was to sit behind this desk and help young men like the ones I got in that clubhouse and to try to make them better players and better persons, too."

But, before Lopez could start his minor league managerial career, he nearly did make the bigs.

Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

Go to Part 3: Pedro Lopez, Drives Him

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Interview Part 1: Pedro Lopez, Different Perspective

Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez, right, watches over batting practice at NYSEG Stadium in August 2014. Lopez played on the 1990 Charleston Rainbows. (G21D Photo)
Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

BINGHAMTON, NY - When a scout came up to ask the teenage Pedro Lopez some questions, Lopez automatically assumed the scout was looking for the other Pedro on the that American Legion team. The good Pedro.

The scout, it turned out, wasn't looking for that Pedro. He had the right Pedro. And he was interested in learning more about him.

It was the first time, Lopez recalled recently, that someone like that had expressed interest in his playing ability.

"First and foremost, it was just a great feeling," Lopez recalled recently to The Greatest 21 Days. "There are people telling you, yeah, you're doing a good job. But when you've got somebody from the outside, that's not family related, it kind of opens up your eyes. It kind of gives you a different perspective."

For Lopez, his eyes were soon opened to things much bigger than someone simply expressing interest in his playing ability.

That conversation with that scout ended up being the seed that started a professional playing career that spanned 13 seasons and a minor league managerial career that continues in 2014.

That playing career took him up to AAA in five seasons. He never made the majors as a player.
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez throws some batting practice at NYSEG Stadium in August 2014. (G21D Photo)
In 2013, after more than a quarter century in the game, Lopez, the manager at AA Binghamton, finally gained the perspective of baseball's highest level. He spent three weeks with the major league club that September as a coach.

Lopez spoke to The Greatest 21 Days recently in his NYSEG Stadium office in Binghamton. Lopez continues to manage the AA Mets in 2014.

Lopez spoke about his origins in the game in his native Puerto Rico. He also touched on his start in the pros and his early struggles adapting to life in the United States. It was conversation with a team booster, he recalled, that helped set him work through those early troubles by turning to his faith.

After spending 13 seasons as a player, Lopez then moved on to his career as a manager. He spoke about his philosophy as a manager, to simply let his players play the game.

It is a philosophy he recalled learning from one of his old minor league managers, Bruce Bochy.

Lopez learned the game while growing up in his native Puerto Rico. He credited his father with basically introducing him to baseball, getting Lopez into all the programs he could. "He always was a big time baseball fan," Lopez recalled.

It was during his first year in American Legion ball that Lopez met that scout from Texas. After the initial confusion, the scout stayed in touch.
Binghamton Mets manager Pedro Lopez, right, in the Binghamton dugout in August 2014. (G21D Photo)
Lopez was interested in playing, but his real goal was to get into sports medicine and be a doctor. "I wanted to be involved with sports and I loved medicine," Lopez said.

The scout learned Lopez was interested in going to college. That led to an opportunity at Arizona Western College. He'd gotten some offers to play professionally, but Lopez chose Arizona Western.

Part of the calculation was money. He and his family didn't feel like the offers were good enough. After his first year there, he ended up getting drafted.

The Padres took him in the 21st round of the 1988 draft. He ended up signing. It was for less money than he would have gotten had he signed earlier, he recalled.

The difference, Lopez said, was his father's health. He'd been injured at work and lingering back problems meant he couldn't return to work.

After he was drafted, Lopez recalled calling his mother and telling her he'd decided it was time for him to do something for the family.

"That kind of changed the whole thing seeing my dad the way he was," Lopez said. "That kind of changed my mind. I did it and I don't regret it."

The plan was Lopez was going to continue school in the off-season. As it turned out, fall instructional league and winter ball left no time for that.

In that first year, though, Lopez recalled being thankful that he spent that year in college. All the classes that he took helped him learn the language better.
Binghamton manager Pedro Lopez heads to the third base coaching box during an August 2014 game in Binghamton. (G21D Photo)
Once in the pros, Lopez got the chance to see if he could really do it. He recalled being about 170 pounds and playing catcher. There were also the cultural differences being from Latin America.

"Once I signed, I saw guys smaller than me and probably my size and I was like, 'I can play here,'" Lopez said.

He played his first season in the rookie Arizona League. He hit .282 in 42 games. The climate there was warm, more akin to where he grew up.

The next year, though, his challenges began. He was assigned to single-A Waterloo, Iowa. In 97 games there, he hit just .191. His poor start continued through the season. The weather, he said, got him.

"It was really hard, it was," Lopez said. "It was just the cold weather early on. That's the thing that really kicked my butt. I really struggled with it ... I still struggle now."

Coming off that season, Lopez moved to single-A Charleston for 1990. He didn't get playing time and he took it hard.

"That year, I think I hit rock bottom," Lopez said. "I did not know what to do."

But then a chance encounter with a Charleston booster originally from Puerto Rico set Lopez right and set him up for another decade as a player and his long career as a minor league manager.

Part 1: Different Perspective | Part 2: That Ride
Part 3: Drives Him | Part 4: Worked Out

Go to Part 2: Pedro Lopez, That Ride

Rafael Santiago, Four Hits - 2031

Rafael Santiago came on in this April 1990 game with his team already down by four.

By the time he was done an inning later, that deficit stood at seven.

Santiago picked up three outs, but gave up four hits in this game against Spartanburg. It was a game Santiago's Charleston Rainbows would go on to lose by a score of 12-2.

Santiago was starting his second season as a pro that April. He ended up getting into just one more campaign. He didn't make it higher than single-A.

Santiago's career began in 1990, taken by the Padres in the 39th round of the draft out of his native Puerto Rico.

Santiago played his first season in the rookie Arizona League. In 12 starts, he went 3-5, with a 3.34 ERA. He also struck out 59.

Santiago moved to single-A Charleston for 1990. There, he got into 25 games, starting 23. He came in with a respectible 3.68 ERA, but his record didn't match. His record on the year was 8-15. He struck out 94.

He's not recorded as playing in 1991. Santiago's final time as a pro came in 1992. Back in the Arizona League, Santiago got into three games in relief. He gave up four earned in four innings of work, ending his career.
1990 CMC-Pro Cards Tally
Players/Coaches Featured:1,737
Made the Majors: 826 - 47.6%
Never Made Majors: 911-52.4%-X
5+ Seasons in the Majors: 358
10+ Seasons in the Minors:209

Paul McClellan, Streak Extended - 9

Originally published Oct. 24, 2011
Paul McClellan was just happy to be a part of the Giants' winning streak in 1991, the pitcher helping his team extend the streak to 11.

McClellan recorded the win in the Giants' 8-1 victory over the Reds Aug. 1. He did so by pitching a complete game, giving up just that single run.

"Everybody was asking me, what if I lose and kill the winning streak?" McClellan told The Associated Press later. "After the first couple innings I relaxed and we started swinging the bats. Everything worked out great."

The Giants winning street didn't last much longer, snapped the next night. McClellan's major league career didn't last much longer, either. His major league career ended with the season's end, McClellan getting 17 total big league outings.

McClellan's career began in 1986, taken by the Giants in the first round of the draft out of Sequoia High School in California.

McClellan played that first year at short-season Everett, getting 13 starts, going 5-4 with a 3.34 ERA. He hit single-A Clinton in 1987, then AA Shreveport in 1988. At Shreveport, McClellan went 10-12, with a 4.04 ERA.

In 1989, McClellan got his first look at AAA with nine starts at Phoenix. He returned to Phoenix in 1990, going just 7-16, with a 5.17 ERA. McClellan, though, still got a September call-up, debuting with San Francisco Sept. 2.

In four outings, one start, with the Giants that September, McClellan gave up 10 runs in 7.2 innings. He also picked up a loss.

He returned to San Francisco in late July 1991, in time to pick up the seventh win in that 11-game winning streak. That win was a 3-0 decision against the Phillies July 27.

McClellan went seven innings in that game. He was only taken out due to calf tightness. As a base runner on third, McClellan was hit by a batted ball from Kevin Mitchell.

"I was able to keep pitching, but it was uncomfortable," McClellan told The AP. "It was tightening up. I'm just happy to do what I did. I was a lot more confident today than when I came up last year."

McClellan's later outings, though, weren't as good. In his third, Aug. 6, he went four innings, giving up seven runs. He had a similar outing Aug. 28, against the Cubs.

After a Sept. 12 outing where he gave up five runs in 4.2 innings against the Reds, McClellan told The AP he wasn't sure what was going on.

"I don't know what I'm doing out there," McClellan told The AP. "I'm better than today."

In all, McClellan got 12 starts in 1991, with one relief outing. He went 3-6, with a 4.56 ERA. His final outing came Oct. 6.

McClellan got 20 more outings in 1991 back at Phoenix. He then moved to the Brewers system for nine outings at AAA Denver. He's not recorded as playing in 1993 or 1994.

McClellan got three final starts at AAA New Orleans in 1995, ending his affiliated career. McClellan went on to finish out his career playing for the independent Sonoma County Crushers of the Western Baseball League.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Troy Cunningham, Heads Up - 2034

Troy Cunningham's Spokane East Valley High School won a spot in the state tournament in May 1983 and Cunningham had a big hand in pitching them there.

Cunningham took a no-hitter into the sixth inning in the regional championship win, according to The Spokane Spokesman-Review. And he did it as a sophomore.

"The kids rose to the occasion," East Valley coach Ken Stacy told The Spokesman-Review. "Cunningham is an amazing young man. He is a heads-up player and is constantly learning."

Cunningham later closed out his high school career and went on to play in college. He also played in the pros. His pro career, though, was brief. He played in only two professional seasons.

Cunningham's pro career began in 1989, taken by the Padres in the 43rd round of the draft out of Gonzaga University.

Cunningham threw a perfect game, striking out 15 in American Legion game in early June 1985, according to The Spokesman-Review. Days later, he was taken by the Padres in the eighth round of the draft. Instead, he went to Gonzaga.

At Gonzaga, Cunningham got a win in relief in a mid-April 1989 game. He also pitched portions of both sides of a double header that same month. But he couldn't keep up his draft stock, taken by the Padres again, but in the 43rd round.

With the Padres, Cunningham started in his hometown, with short-season Spokane. In his professional debut, Cunningham picked up a 4-3 win.

"Cunningham threw well; I just took him out because he'd thrown enough pitches," Spokane manager Bruce Bochy told The Spokane Chronicle afterward. He did a good job. ... The pitching was outstanding tonight."

Cunningham went on to get into 18 games for Spokane that year, starting three. He picked up that one win and two losses. His ERA came in at 6.15.

He returned for 1990 at single-A Charleston. In 40 outings, 15 starts, Cunningham went just 4-11, with a 4.33 ERA. It was his final season as a pro.
1990 CMC-Pro Cards Tally
Players/Coaches Featured:1,736
Made the Majors: 826 - 47.6%
Never Made Majors: 910-52.4%-X
5+ Seasons in the Majors: 358
10+ Seasons in the Minors:209
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