Monday, February 20, 2017

Frank Carey, Two Straight - 4

Originally published Feb. 1, 2015
Stanford won its second-straight College World Series championship in 1988 and helping them get there was Frank Carey.

Carey went 4 for 4 in one regional game and three in a series game. To The Associated Press after the big win, Carey reacted to his team's success.

"This is great to come back here and win it two years in a row," Carey told The AP. "You need a lot of intangibles to work. This is unbelievable."

Carey went on to turn pro the next year. His professional career, though, was brief, just three seasons. He briefly made AA, but didn't make it higher.

Carey's career began in 1989, taken by the Giants in the eighth round of the draft out of Stanford.

With Stanford, Carey hit a two-run triple to give Stanford a lead in a 1987 College World Series game.

In 1988, Carey picked up those four hits in the regional game to send the Cardinal on to Omaha. Then, in Stanford's first game, Carey hit a two run shot and got two other hits.

As a pro, Carey started at single-A Clinton. He hit .242 in 64 games. He returned to Clinton in 1990, playing part of the year at high-A San Jose. He hit .292 between them.

Carey played 1991 back at San Jose. In 99 games, he hit .279. He also got five games at AA Shreveport. In five at bats, he didn't get a hit. It was his final season as a pro.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Juan Belbru, His Run - 26

Juan Belbru went on a run at short-season Hamilton in 1990 that caught the notice of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Belbru smacked nine home runs in 148 at bats, a pace noted in The Post-Dispatch that August.

Despite his run, Belbru's run in pro ball was about to end. That was his fourth season in the pros. It also marked his final season.

Belbru's career began in 1987, signed by the Cardinals as a free agent out of his native Puerto Rico. He has also been credited as Juan Belru.

Belbru started with the Cardinals with rookie Johnson City. He got into 23 games there, hitting .150 with one home run.

He returned to Johnson City for 1988. He hit .230 that year over 64 games. In 1989, at single-A Savannah, he hit just .199 in 91 games. He accumulated seven home runs each season.

In 1990, Belbru played mostly at Hamilton, getting another four games at high-A St. Petersburg. He went 3 for 5, with two runs scored and an RBI in an August game for Hamilton. Overall, he hit .262, with 10 total home runs, ending his career.
  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Aug. 11, 1990: Baseball
1990 Minor League Tally
Players/Coaches Featured: 2,539
Made the Majors:1,016-40.0%
Never Made Majors:1,523-60.0%-X
5+ Seasons in the Majors: 422
10+ Seasons in the Minors:259

Mike Newby, College Transfer - 11

The University of San Diego baseball team took on some transfers for 1988, including pitcher Mike Newby, according to The Los Angeles Times.

The transfers had head coach John Cunningham looking forward to the year.

"I still think we have a good shot at being quite successful this season," Cunningham told The Times. "On paper, we have the makings of a pretty fine team."

Newby went on from San Diego to turn pro. His pro career, however, turned out to be brief. He played a single season.

Newby's career began and ended in 1990, signed by the Cardinals as an undrafted free agent out of San Diego.

Newby's college career started at Mt. San Jacinto College. He then moved to San Diego for 1988. He came on in relief and helped preserve an April 1988 win. In another game that month, Newby shut down opposing hitters for four innings on two hits.

With the Cardinals, Newby played at short-season Hamilton. He got into 24 games, all in relief. He picked up three wins, two saves and a 2.73 ERA, marking the extent of his career.
1990 Minor League Tally
Players/Coaches Featured: 2,538
Made the Majors:1,016-40.0%
Never Made Majors:1,522-60.0%-X
5+ Seasons in the Majors: 422
10+ Seasons in the Minors:259

Chris Hancock, Relief Pitcher - 8

Originally published Jan. 27, 2015
Chris Hancock was one of two quarterbacks at Fontana High School in 1986 and in one November game he helped lead them to a win, according to The Los Angeles Times.

Hancock's coach Dick Bruich explained the approach to The Times afterward.

"We've done that 'switch quarterbacks' every game this year," Bruich told The Times. "Hancock is our relief pitcher."

Hancock was also an actual Fontana High School pitcher. Soon, he'd be an actual professional pitcher, though a starter and not a reliever.

Hancock's professional playing career lasted nearly a decade, but he never made the majors.

Hancock's playing career began in 1988, taken by the Giants in the second round of the draft out of Fontana High.

With the Giants, Hancock started at rookie Pocatello. He went 2-5 in 11 starts, with an 8.86 ERA.

He then split 1989 between short-season Everett and single-A Clinton and played most of 1990 at Clinton. His 1990 season, limited to 19 outings, 18 starts, resulted in a 11-3 record and a 2.21 ERA.

After getting just nine starts in 1991 at high-A San Jose, Hancock made AA Shreveport for the first time in 1992.

Hancock made AAA in 1994, getting nine outings, one start, at Phoenix. He went 1-0, with a 7.71 ERA and played the rest of the year at Shreveport.

He moved to the Marlins system for 1995, getting just four outings there. He played the rest of the year in independent ball between Tyler and Aleandria.

His final season came in 1996 at Tyler. He went 2-7 in 12 outings, nine starts, with a 6.47 ERA, ending his career.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Marino Hernandez, Team Photo - 16

Marino Hernandez posed with his 1990 Clinton Giants teammates for the team photo, one of several photos spotted hanging in the Clinton team store in 2014.

Hernandez took a spot in the back row, fourth position from the right.

He posed for that photo in his third professional season. He also posed for it near the end of his professional career. Pitched in those three seasons and didn't return for a fourth.

Hernandez' career began in 1988, signed by the Giants as a free agent out of his native Dominican Republic.

Hernandez started with the Giants at rookie Pocatello. He got into 19 games, all in relief. He turned in a 5.16 ERA in 22.2 innings.

He returned to Pocatello for 1989 and also saw time at short-season Everett and single-A Clinton. Hernandez turned starter, getting into 21 games, starting 16. He went 4-6 overall, with a 6.52 ERA.

Hernandez then played his final pro season at Clinton in 1990. He got into 15 games, starting one. His ERA came in at 4.17, ending his career.
1990 Minor League Tally
Players/Coaches Featured: 2,537
Made the Majors:1,016-40.1%
Never Made Majors:1,521-59.9%-X
5+ Seasons in the Majors: 422
10+ Seasons in the Minors:259

Chris Alesio, Worked Out - 22

Chris Alesio could have gone elsewhere to play his college ball, but chose Siena College, near his hometown outside Schenectady, NY, he told The Schenectady Daily Gazette in 2014.

"I picked Siena, and everyone thought I was crazy," Alesio told The Daily Gazette. "But coach (Tony) Rossi told me that he would make sure I graduated, and that I would also start. It worked out great for me."

Alesio spoke on the occasion of making the Siena College Athletics Hall of Fame. Alesio went on from Siena to make the pros. He played a single season, then went on to a long career in medical device sales.

Alesio's pro career began and ended in 1990, signed by the Cardinals as an undrafted free agent out of Siena.

At Siena, Alesio hit five home runs and stole nine bases as a freshman in 1986. He hit .357 over his career, still fourth best in school history. He also smacked 149 total hits.

Alesio hoped to be drafted, but that didn't materialize. Instead, he signed as a free agent.

"That's been my dream since I was 12," Alesio told one paper in 1988 about going pro. "Just show me the dotted line."

With the Cardinals, Alesio played his season at short-season Hamilton. He got into 39 games in the field, hitting .217. He knocked in 10 runs and stole two bases.

Alesio also got brief time on the mound. In three appearances, he pitched six innings and gave up four earned runs.

Since his season as a pro, Alesio returned home and started his career in medical device sales. He made the Siena Hall of Fame in 2014.

I think I took the energy that I put into baseball, athletics and schooling and I said 'let me take that energy and see what I can do in life,'" Alesio told Siena in his induction video. "And I think it's just helped me stay focused."
1990 Minor League Tally
Players/Coaches Featured: 2,536
Made the Majors:1,016-40.1%
Never Made Majors:1,520-59.9%-X
5+ Seasons in the Majors: 422
10+ Seasons in the Minors:259

Randy Johnson, Asked For - 15

Originally published Jan. 28, 2015
Randy Johnson signed on with the Giants as a free agent in 1989. He then set about trying to prove his worth, The Spokane Chronicle wrote.

He did that in a July game, accounting for four of his Everett Giants' six runs in a win over Spokane. He hit a three-run home run and knocked in another on a single, The Chronicle wrote.

"All I asked for was the opportunity," Johnson told The Chronicle. "I told myself I just wanted to give 110 percent and see what I can do at this level."

Johnson took that opportunity to a .273 average that year for Everett. But he could only take it to one more professional season, making single-A, but he couldn't make it higher.

Johnson's career began that year in 1989, signed by the Giants out of Portland State University.

With the Giants, Johnson started at short-season Everett. In 68 games, he hit three home runs and knocked in 27. He also stole 19 bases.

He moved to single-A Clinton for 1990. There, though, he got into just 32 games. He hit .222, didn't get a home run and stole three bases. It was his final season as a pro.
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