Wednesday, October 31, 2012

1990 Nashville Sounds

Features on each member of the 1990 Nashville Sounds, AAA affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds.

Interviews (3)
1 - Terry McGriff, Chose Baseball
Terry McGriff chose baseball over football, then made the majors. He went on to play two decades as a pro, then moved into coaching.
2 - Paul Noce, The Deal
Paul Noce took chose to take everyday spot back at AA. It paid off the next year, as he found himself in the majors.
3 - Donnie Scott, Down the Road
Donnie Scott made it back to the majors after six years away. It was preparation for being a manager in the minors.

1990 Nashville Sounds (29) 
1 - Neil Allen, Whole Career
Neil Allen made his name in the bullpen with the Mets. He extended his career as a starter with the White Sox.
2 - Skeeter Barnes, Dream Realized
Skeeter Barnes literally dreamed about making it back to the majors. He then made it back.
3 - Keith Brown, Didn't Lose
Keith Brown made it back from cancer to play as pro again. His quest to return to the majors, though, fell short.
4 - Tony DeFrancesco, Communication Skills
Tony DeFrancesco used his communication skills often.
5 - Leo Garcia, High Five
Leo Garcia's high five skills weren't so good. His playing skills were good enough for 54 major league games.
6 - Chris Hammond, Lot of Fun
Chris Hammond had fun in his fifth major league season with two-straight shutouts. He went on to play in 14 major league seasons.
7 - Milt Hill, Good Competitor
Milt Hill threw an excellent split-finger, enough to pitch in four major league seasons.
8 - Rodney Imes, No Pressure
Rodney Imes helped AA Albany to the 1989 league championship, he then helped himself to AAA. Imes never could help himself to the majors.
9 - Reggie Jefferson, Inopportune Times
Reggie Jefferson played in nine major league seasons, but he also had his share of injuries.
10 - Chris Jones, Just Hit
Chris Jones told himself to shut up and hit. He then went on to hit in the majors in nine seasons.
11 - Brian Lane, His Day
Brian Lane got a look at a major league perfect-game pitcher. He never got a look at the majors.
12 - Keith Lockhart, Kept Progressing
Keith Lockhart kept progressing and kept working hard. He kept playing in the bigs for 10 seasons.
13 - Chris Lombardozzi, What Happens
Chris Lombardozzi knew the big leagues was possible. His brother got there.
14 - Rob Lopez, Off Balance
Rob Lopez kept hitters off-balance at the University of North Alabama and in the minors. He never got a chance to do so in the majors.
15 - Pete Mackanin, Good Way
Pete Mackanin knew to make a move as manager without waiting. Still waiting for a full-time major league manager's spot.
16 - Terry McGriff, Draft Hopes
Terry McGriff was drafted out of high school, by the team he wanted to be drafted by. It was a dream come true.
17 - Charlie Mitchell, Family Trade
Charlie Mitchell had a chance to make the Red Sox with his brother John. Both made the majors, but not with same team.
18 - Robert Moore, Best Arm
Spotted in spring training, Robert Moore's manager saw him as a reliever. It got him to the majors.
19 - Darryl Motley, Biggest Game
Darryl Motley had good games as a pro, but none were better than Game 7 of the 1985 World Series.
20 - Paul Noce, Hard Work
Paul Noce's advice on making the majors: Work Hard, don't listen to naysayers. Noce worked hard and made it in parts of two seasons.
21 - Kevin Pearson, Goals Set
Kevin Pearson stressed the importance of setting goals in 1991. He never accomplished his personal goal of making the majors.
22 - Ray Rippelmeyer, Those Things
Coach Ray Rippelmeyer wasn't concerned with his starter's slow start in 1975. That starter was Steve Carlton.
23 - Rosario Rodriguez, Key Outs
Rosario Rodriguez got key outs for the Pirates in 1991. He made three major league seasons.
24 - Donnie Scott, Switch-Hitter
Donnie Scott's father helped teach him to be a switch-hitter. Switch-hitting helped him make the majors.
25 - Scott Scudder, Got Back
Scott Scudder got sent down to start 1990. But he soon returned, and played in a total of five major league seasons.
26 - Bob Sebra, On Purpose
Bob Sebra's final major league pitch was a beanball. The pitch resulted in a suspension, but he never served it.
27 - Eddie Tanner, Playing Time
Eddie Tanner did well enough to make AAA squads in five seasons. He never did well enough to make the bigs.
28 - Joey Vierra, Greatest Memory
Joey Vierra wanted his major league debut to mean something, if it ever happened. It never did happen.
29 - John Young, All-Star Trainer
John Young was a trainer for a quarter century by 2002. That year, he also returned to the AAA All-Star Game.

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